What’s In a Name? Anyone’s Guess With Voice Recog. Software

Most commercial voice recognition programs have developed to the point that they handle standard language and sentences fairly accurately.  But I find that even the king of ‘em, Dragon NaturallySpeaking, still blunders with names.  Here are a few examples I’ve experienced:

What I actually said to my computer: Joe’s police squad
How my voice software translated it:  Jewish police squad

What I actually said to my computer: Brad
How my voice software translated it:  brat

Sometimes, the software does better with a whole name.  But not always:

What I actually said to my computer: Brad Baker
How my voice software translated it:  bread baker

What I actually said to my computer: Ann Rockley
How my voice software translated it:  and broccoli 

What I actually said to my computer: Lisa Little
How my voice software translated it:  lease a little

Dragon NaturallySpeaking is more likely to correctly understand famous names, no doubt because those names have been programmed in.  Even so, it errs there sometimes.  For example, I was listing three famous Russian film directors of the silent film era.  And Dragon NaturallySpeaking got all three wrong:

What I actually said to my computer:  Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Kuleshov
How my voice software translated it:   Einstein, poodles can, Khrushchev

Apparently, Dragon NaturallySpeaking particularly doesn’t care for Russians:

What I actually said to my computer: Dostoyevsky
How my voice software translated it:  ghostly ASCII

If you use Dragon NaturallySpeaking or any other voice recognition software and have experienced its erroneous naming of names, please share using the blog’s comments.

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